Peace and Hair Bleach

Let’s be honest ladies: we all have some kind of facial/body hair issue. Whether your Middle-Eastern, African American, Latino etc, you suffer from some form of Hairy Monster-Ness. I’m a huge fan of bleach. Whoever Jolen is really hit the nail on the head, because this is the best quality, low-price face/body hair bleach I have ever used. Talk about cheap and easy to use! For about $6-8 bucks, you can find Jolen Hair Bleach almost anywhere: grocery stores, Walmart, Target, Ulta, and even Rite Aid, CVS and Walgreens.
Growing up, I was always embarassed of how dark, thick black hairs would grow all over my pale skin, showing up even worse than on other girls my age. I used to cry out “Why, God…WHY?!” Then, a few years later I took control. I’ve been using Jolen on my fur-spots since that fateful day in fifth grade when my mother brought out the cheery little turquise box from her cosmetics cabinet and said “Your mustache is darker than your father’s, honey. It’s time.”
Nowadays, I don’t really have to use it as often, but every once in a while, whether it’s my lower back, sideburns or back of my neck, I’ll whip it out. For those of you who are bleach virgins, here are some easy steps below:
1) You will need: a Jolen kit, a bowl and rubber gloves.

2) For myself, I use the little spatula it comes with and pick up a heaping scoop of the cream. For each “heapful” I add two little scoops of the activating powder. The powder is what makes the bleach strong. Since I have super dark hair and my skin is not sensitive, I add a lot of the powder to quickly lighten the hair. If you have sensitive skin, I suggest doing a test run on your arm and seeing if your skin reacts before applying. You may want to go easy on the activating powder as well.

3) I mix the cream and powder activator in a small bowl (I use an old Lush container) and mix it together with my fingers. I should point out that wearing rubber gloves is a good idea here.

4) You can immediately apply a thin layer of this mixture to the “affected” areas and let it sit for at least 5 minutes.

5) Rinse off with warm water and soap and apply a gentle face lotion.
Ta-da! You will feel like a new woman!

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2 thoughts on “Peace and Hair Bleach

  1. “Growing up, I was always embarassed of how dark, thick black hairs would grow all over my pale skin, showing up even worse than on other girls my age. I used to cry out “Why, God…WHY?!” Then, a few years later I took control. I’ve been using Jolen on my fur-spots since that fateful day in fifth grade when my mother brought out the cheery little turquise box from her cosmetics cabinet and said “Your mustache is darker than your father’s, honey. It’s time.””

    I went through the same thing too when Mom told me to use bleach, as if already being shy and having no close friends wasn’t bad enough.

    I trusted her, because she has the same problem.

    Guess what, it didn’t make me look like the woman in the photo on the bleach box (even Jolen has photos of women on some of their other facial hair bleach products) who obviously shaved or waxed or something instead of bleaching. I still looked like a girl with a beard and mustache, and I had no friends close enough to call and ask for a reality check before I went back to school the next day…

    …and other kids actually saw my blonde beard and mustache…

    …and didn’t automatically think it looked OK just because Mom did (she has no concept of “looks only a mother could love” and acts more “I love how you look therefore everyone knows how you look”)…

    …and kept bullying me even after I switched to shaving (they *remembered* what I looked like before).

    This trashed some crucial formative years for me (now I’m struggling to catch up learning social skills the way people who didn’t start learning a foreign language until their teens still struggle to catch up to native speakers years later). 😦

    How do people treat you for having a blonde beard and mustache? I hope it’s better than I was treated.

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